NewsHurricane Beryl devastates Texas: Power cuts, fatalities, and flight chaos

Hurricane Beryl devastates Texas: Power cuts, fatalities, and flight chaos

Hurricane Beryl struck the coast of Texas. Millions of people without power.
Hurricane Beryl struck the coast of Texas. Millions of people without power.
Images source: © Getty Images | Houston Chronicle/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images
Sara Bounaoui

9 July 2024 09:13

Hurricane Beryl, which struck the coast of Texas, caused over two million residents to lose access to electricity. Falling trees killed two people. Houston Airports located on the hurricane's path cancelled over a thousand flights.

Dan Patrick, the state inspector who is currently substituting for the Texas governor who is abroad, explained that emergency power crews cannot repair downed power lines until the wind strength decreases.

Patrick also warned that heavy rainfall continues, and the ground is already saturated with water. As a result, residents may face flooding and waterlogging issues for the next few days. "This is not a one-day event," he emphasised.

After the hurricane hit, over two million residents around Houston are without power.
After the hurricane hit, over two million residents around Houston are without power.© Getty Images | Brandon Bell

Two people dead. Over a thousand flights cancelled, flooded roads

According to the authorities of Harris County in Texas, the hurricane contributed to the deaths of at least two United States residents - people died when trees uprooted by the wind fell on their homes.

The National Weather Service (NWS) reported that Beryl contributed to the formation of at least three confirmed tornadoes in eastern Texas. The dangerous phenomena were moving northwest.

Many roads in southern Texas were flooded and blocked, and traffic lights were also not functioning. Houston airports cancelled over a thousand flights.

Before Hurricane Beryl made landfall, Texas authorities issued warnings to coastal residents. They were advised to prepare for flooding, heavy rains, and strong winds.

In several counties, officials called for voluntary evacuations from low-lying areas. A ban on camping on the beach was also issued.

Beryl is moving inland

It is predicted that the storm will gradually move north, and then northeast.

- Beryl’s moving inland but this is not the end of the story yet - stated Jack Beven, a senior hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center.

A Harris County official, Lina Hidalgo, warned residents to take hurricane-related threats seriously "as if a tornado were approaching your area."

"We need you to prepare and be ready for the next 24 hours," she said, advising people to take shelter away from windows, in their homes, in safe places.

Last week, Hurricane Beryl passed through the Caribbean, where a total of 11 people died, and then through Mexico, where fortunately no fatalities were recorded.

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